Van Gogh’s Sunflowers Series

Sunflowers (Tournesols) are the names of two still life series painted by Vincent van Gogh. The first series of paintings, performed in Paris in 1887, depicted the flowers lying on the ground. In the second series, which was made a year later at Arles, he painted a bouquet of sunflowers in a vase. In the artist’s mind, both sets are connected to the name of friend-artist Paul Gauguin, who bought two versions of the painting in Paris. About eight months later, Van Gogh hoped to welcome and impress Gauguin once again with Sunflowers. They are now part of the Gold House décor that he prepares for the living room of his house in Arles, where Gauguin will stay. After Gauguin left, Van Gogh imagined two versions of the wings decorated for Berceuse Triptych. And he eventually included them in his Les XX Bruxelles exhibition.

Sunflowers in Paris

We do not know much about Van Gogh‘s activities during the two years he lived with his younger brother in Paris (1886-1888). In fact, his drawing of sunflowers was only revealed in the spring of 1889 when Gauguin announced the exchange of one of the sunflower versions in Arles for the research he had left after leaving Arles to Paris. . Van Gogh felt uneasy and replied that Gauguin had absolutely no right to make this request.

On the 2 sunflower paintings that Van Gogh still wondered, each picture painted two flowers. One of them was started by a small study and a fourth large painting combined the two compositions. These are Van Gogh’s first paintings that “nothing but sunflowers.

Sunflowers in Arles

Ignoring the first two versions, all the Sunflower paintings in Arles were painted on canvas of size 30

These paintings are nothing like the detailed description of the series on canvas size 15 as shown by Van Gogh. The remaining paintings have a different number of flowers than Van Gogh described. The second version is obviously enlarged and changed the original by adding two flowers located at the front, center and right. Neither the third nor the fourth versions show either ten or fourteen flowers as indicated by the artist, but actually more: fifteen or sixteen. These changes are made by wet-on-wet technique and are therefore considered to be his own drawing. Even more so when they were copied into copies in January 1889. There are no traces of later edits, at least in this respect.

Find other artwork under Picasso’s paintings

By performing a series of spectroscopy scans on La Misrereuse accroupie, experts discovered new details and provided insight into the creative process of the artist ahead of time – Picasso.

In 1957, when Pablo Picasso was in his teens, he thought that X-ray technology could one day discover a lost work beneath one of his first paintings. Today, that prediction has come true – although the technology now far exceeds conventional X-rays.

Using ultra-modern tools to study one of Picasso’s Blue Period paintings, the researchers not only discovered new details hidden in the work of art, but also went into the process. creation of famous artist. This investigation in many ways focused on the painting La Misrereuse accroupie, also known as Crouching Woman. This work was drawn in 1902 and is currently owned by the Art Gallery of Ontario. La Misrereuse accroupie shows that this radical artist was inspired by the essential lines of a basic landscape painting painted by an unknown artist.

The analysis also showed that many of the incremental changes to the woman’s posture are depicted in the picture. The research team said the results of their analysis today at a meeting of the Association for the Advancement of American Science in Austin, Texas 2018: “We often look at an image in the way that it was. shaped from the beginning. But with these analytical images, we can better understand the artist and the creative process, ”said Marc Walton, professor of material science and engineering studies at Northwestern University.


To investigate, John Delaney from the National Gallery of Art performed a series of spectroscopy scans on La Misrereuse accroupie. Delaney’s optical reflection spectrum scans the image at different wavelengths, from near-infrared to infrared. These devices helped reveal the exact pigments that Picasso used.

A team of Northwestern engineers and materials scientists conducted additional scans with portable X-ray fluorescence equipment, stimulating the elements of each layer of pigment in the picture. The results have produced detailed grayscale maps so that we can see the incremental changes that Picasso has made for his inner work.

The overall work has uncovered a landscape previously known and unrelated to the topic of Picasso’s painting, with particularly novel details. It shows the sudden presence of a hand in a rather awkward position holding a plate: “We can see that he is cleaning the drawing and fixing the position of the fingers” – Mr. Walton , who helped develop the X-ray scanner, adds.

The history of Origami paper folding art

The history of Origami paper folding art

If you love Japan, surely you can’t help knowing about the art of folding paper in Japan, Origami. Just go to Google to search the keyword “Japanese Origami”, or go to youtube to type “Origami paper folding”, you will get a lot of results: instructing how to do, history, groups, folding clubs or teaching clips Origami is beautiful.

Origami is the art of paper folding (or folding paper) originating from Japan. Let’s learn about the history of the formation and development of Origami to understand more about this unique art.

What is Origami?

The name Origami is made up of two words: “ori” is “folded” and “kami” is “paper”. This word has only been used since 1880. Before that, Japanese people often used the word Orikata.

Origami has a fairly simple folding way to turn a rectangular piece of paper (2-dimensional), which is usually square, into complex shapes (3-dimensional). There is no cutting during folding. This is also the trend of folding modern Origami paper. In addition to Origami, in Japan, there is another intellectual subject called Shogi flag.

The history of Japanese Origami paper folding

Since its appearance, Origami has become an interesting feature of Japanese customs. Just use small pieces of paper that can transform into different shapes, such as an animal, a flower, etc.

Because the material of this subject is quite simple, it is easy to carry out anywhere. This game is popular not only in Japan but also in many other places in the world.

We know very little about the origin of Origami. Some say that Origami originated from China about 2000 years ago. But this is hardly true. This concept is conjecture based on the assumption that Origami started right after the invention of paper, there is no evidence to verify this. The paper of the Late Han Dynasty shows no sign of Origami.